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Ross Frank

Ross Frank

FRANK ROSS

Identity Number                   5512215716084

Place of Birth                        Newton (Wellington)

Extramural activities: Jogging, Outdoor life, painting

Employment                          Supervision over workers at Foodcan (Paarl) 1975 – 1989

FRANK ROSS

Identity Number                   5512215716084

Place of Birth                        Newton (Wellington)

Extramural activities: Jogging, Outdoor life, painting

Employment                          Supervision over workers at Foodcan (Paarl) 1975 – 1989

Education                               Paulus Joubert High (Paarl) 1970

Volunteer Experience          Donation to the Ruth Prowse Arts School

Languages                             English & Afrikaans

Security Clearance              No criminal offences

Nationality                            South African

Marital Status                      Married

Sex                                         Male

Patents & Publications        SA Art Diary 2000;  Review on paintings in Cape Times (1998), Cape Argus (2000) 

Profile           

Self-taught artist who works as a painter. Loves to experiment with different media and painting techniques. Very interested in the African culture and landscapes and is strongly influenced by the richness of it.

“My approach to painting is uncomplicated and direct. I don’t keep books on art in my home. I didn’t have any formal tuition or training in art and is unaware of any conventions for portraying the human figure. My work is original response to my environment. I was discovered by the E’Bezweni Art group (E.A.G) in 1996. This group was established in Paarl in October 1994 by Selwyn Pekeur in Association with Alby Bailey, Solomon Siko, Kerwin Cupido and Dylan Denyssen. Art Groups such as E’Bezweni and the earlier Vakalisa have provided a platform for emerging talent in the so-called disadvantaged communities. Lacking the means for a formal art education I benefited from their meeting and workshops. These were marked by a vigorous climate of experimentation and lively discussions. The group influenced each other in areas such as the use of incised superwood and what the choice of vibrant Palette are.

Two distinct approaches to art making become apparent in my work. One is a spontaneous, emotive painterly approach. I sketch the figure roughly and then I paint. As I work, it comes together and then I can see what is happening. Normally I see somebody working. I don’t know where he is coming from. Or how far. Most people have to walk a distance. If they want to do something,they do it. That’s what gives me inspiration. They had nothing,but they go on. In these painitings strong brush strokes and visceral quality of the oil paints amplify my experience. Colour is important to me. Red symbolizes the unhappiness I associated with the land. There’s always trouble. People have so many problems with land. Then there is the political trouble. The way is often uphill, the load heavy. I paint the roads through the Boland bordered by vineyards and wheatfield. I paint laborers toiling in the fields, women gathering wood.